Creating partially applied functions in Javascript

Note: This post originally appeared on Codeburst.

In functional programming parlance “partial application” of a function involves reducing the number of arguments it accepts (it’s “arity”) by some N, returning a new function. Concretely, consider a function with the following signature:

Logger.log(level, dateFormat, msg)

With partial application we’d be able to do something like:

const info = partial(Logger.log, “info”, “ISO8601”);

And then subsequently be able to call our new “info” function like:

info(“Application started”)

To output an “info” message with ISO8601 date formatting.

So how can we accomplish this in JavaScript? Well you could use Lodash but that’s not really exciting.

Using Function.arguments

The classical functional programming approach would be to use the Function.arguments property to dynamically create a new partially applied function. Running with the example above, you’d end up with an implementation that looks like, (Run it on JSFiddle):

Pulling it apart, its straightforward. Save a reference to a list of the arguments that you want to “fill in”, create a new function for the partial, inside this new function combine the saved arguments with the arguments the partial is called with and execute the original function.

This works but is there a cleaner way?

Function.bind

Although it’s normally used for setting the “this” value a function will be invoked with, it’s possible to use bind() for partial application. If you check out the Function.bind docs you’ll notice that in addition to setting “this” it’s able to set the arguments for the function its operating on. By leveraging this along with Function.apply we’ll be able to cook of partial functions. The implementation ends up being something like (On JSFiddle):

Well that’s about it for partially applied functions. If you’re feeling adventurous and want to head down the functional programming check out the related topic, currying.

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