Taken Audio MadLibs

Because sometimes it’s just fun to make something absurd: http://taken.setfive.com/.

taken

If you aren’t familiar, the Taken movie series (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0936501/) is a set of ridiculous action dramas that have acquired a strong cult following over the years (deservedly or not). All of the movies basically involve someone close to a retired CIA agent, played by Liam Neeson, being “Taken” and Neeson subsequently raining hell over anyone involved in wronging him. As a result of the movie series, Liam Neeson has made a formidable run at Kiefer Sutherland’s title of today’s Chuck Norris. Neeson, who plays the main character in the movie employs his signature throat punch in place of Norris’ roundhouse kick.

Our team seems to share a fondness for laughable action movies and actually took the afternoon off to watch the latest Taken 3 film when it debuted a couple weeks ago. With a little bit of vacation downtime prior to the debut and the urge to develop a web application as preposterous as the film series, we came up with the idea of creating Taken Audio MadLibs (http://taken.setfive.com/). For those of you not familiar MadLibs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mad_Libs) is a phrasal template word game where one player prompts others for a list of words to substitute for blanks in a story, before reading the – often comical or nonsensical – story aloud.

So our take on the MadLibs program works something like this:

-There are four different “story lines” which all involve dialog between Liam Neesons character and a second character
-Neesons lines are actual lines from the Taken movies
-The other character’s lines are transformed into audio clips by Google’s unofficial Text To Speech (TTS) API and are based on the words you enter into a simple webform
-The lines are combined together into a hilarious back and forth dialog between Neeson and your character

Technically, there really isn’t too much “magic” going on with the program. It’s built on the Symfony2 framework and employs a simple one page parallax scrolling design for the web forms. Once the user submits the web form for their story we send it off to the controller where the user entered words are inserted into a set of templated lines. These text lines are then sent off to the Google TTS API which returns an .mp3 audio file with the audio representation of the text. We then splice together the Google TTS mp3 lines with the Taken audio files that we have stored on the server and combine into one audio file. The audio file is returned to the UI in the form of a HTML5 audio tag where the user can play or download the file. We also provide the user with the option of emailing the audio file to a friend if they would like to.

There were two problems that we ran into worth mentioning for those of you playing around with Google’s TTS api or combining multiple audio files of different formats.

1. Google’s TTS API only accepts 100 characters per call so you’ll have to split a given line or sentence into 100 character chunks and then combine the multiple mp3s back into one. This isn’t too difficult to do but worth mentioning if you ever plan to play around with this API.

2. We did run into a bit of trouble trying to combine the .mp3 files that Google returned with the Taken audio .mp3 files we got from (http://www.soundboard.com/sb/Taken_sound_clips). The problem is that the frame rate of the Google .mp3 files is different than the Taken files so when we tried to combine them into one some audio players would not render the resulting file. To get around these issues we took the following steps the combine and massage the audio files via a couple different server-side Linux-based Audio programs (avconv and oggCat):

  • combine the “chunked” Google .mp3s into one .ogg representing a single line in the dialog: “avconv -i [mp3_input_file] -acodec libvorbis -q:a 5 [ogg_output_file]”
  • convert the Taken “line” .mp3 files to individual .ogg files: “avconv -i [mp3_input_file] -acodec libvorbis -q:a 5 [ogg_output_file]”
  • combine the final Google “line” .ogg files with the Taken “line” .ogg files: “oggCat [ogg_output_file] [ogg_input_file_1] [ogg_input_file_2] [ogg_input_file_3] ….”
  • convert the final .ogg file to .wav so all browser types will play nice (shakes fist at safari): “avconv -i [ogg_input_file] [wav_output_file]”

Anyways, if you haven’t checked out the final program yet it can be seen here http://taken.setfive.com/ and if you have any questions, comments, or feedback feel free to leave them below.

Posted In: Tips n' Tricks